Vacancy: C | C++ Programmer

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MetOcean Solutions (a team within the New Zealand’s MetService) is seeking a developer to help develop libraries and APIs that work with multidimensional geospatial datasets. This involves reading datasets as fast as possible and then interpolating or extrapolating the data to get the desired outputs. After the initial 6 - 12 month project there is space to move into different directions, AI, GPU programmer, cloud development etc…

The successful candidate will be working with the Marine Services and Delivery Team comprised of three developers and a team leader within a larger team of 21 scientists / developers who also produce code.

As a company we believe in rigorous scientific method and in applying the latest information technology to data services. We encourage our people to bring fresh ideas to the table, rise to any challenge, and remain enthusiastic about our products and the company mission. Our company promotes a positive working environment to achieve our shared goals, supported by flexible hours to ensure a healthy work-life balance.

Required Qualifications: Computer science degree or similar equivalent experience

To apply you must have the following skills and experience:

  • At least 3 years of programming in the C or C++ language.
  • An ability to write performant and well-architected code.
  • Some familiarity with applied mathematics (linear algebra, linear regression…)
  • Able to research and implement algorithms.

The following are desirable but not essential:

  • Python Coding
  • Experience with geophysical datasets.
  • Knowledge of CUDA or GPU computation framework.
  • Container technology like Docker.
  • Knowledge of cloud based services like AWS and Google Cloud.

Our ideal candidate would demonstrate the following characteristics:

  • Ability to understand complex structures and break them down into meaningful parts.
  • Integrity and high standards.
  • Methodical logical approach to problem-solving.
  • A supportive and positive attitude.

Please note before you apply: This role is a permanent full-time position, but hours can be flexible to suit your lifestyle. Pay is based on skills and experience. The job position is in our Raglan office (New Zealand), however remote working will be considered for the right candidate. Applications close on 10 August 2018. Applications close on 10 August 2018.

To apply for this position, please email your cover letter and CV to: careers@metocean.co.nz. Please reference "Application for a C Programmer" in the subject line.

Meet us at the NZ Marine Sciences Society Conference

MetOcean Solutions will be at the New Zealand Marine Sciences Society Annual Conference in Napier this week.

At the conference, MetOcean Solutions Project Manager Dr Brett Beamsley will present 'Near real-time forecasting of contamination risks to shellfish harvests and beaches' in the ‘Innovating through Technology’ session. This talk presents results of a research program involving Cawthron, NIWA and Metocean Solutions that contributes to the National Science Challenges through the Sustainable Seas – Valuable Seas research program. The goal of the project is to develop and supply near real-time forecasts of coastal water quality by combining catchment models with a high-resolution coastal hydrodynamic model to forecast contamination risk. Understanding the risk profile for beaches and aquaculture areas will allow better management of these valuable assets, leading to safer recreational use and increased productivity respectively.

 Example of particle tracking simulation using MetOceanTrack.

Example of particle tracking simulation using MetOceanTrack.

In the ‘Special Session: Marine Biosecurity on the Frontline’, Brett will present 'Understanding the spread of nonindigenous species', showing MetOceanTrack, an interactive application that has been developed with the Ministry for Primary Industry to model the potential spread of an organism or contaminant around the coastline of New Zealand. The application integrates a particle tracking model that simulates an array of biological responses (die off, life stages, etc.) within both 3-dimensional regional and local scale hydrodynamics, represented by a 10-year hindcast.

 Bathymetry of the Waikato Coastal Marine Area (east and west)

Bathymetry of the Waikato Coastal Marine Area (east and west)

In addition, Oceanographer Dr Sarah Gardiner will present ‘Habitat mapping for the Waikato Region Coastal Marine Area: Bathymetry and substrate type’ in the ‘State of the Marine Environment’ session. Effective management of coastal resources relies on an understanding of the state of, and the impact of pressures on, the coastal marine area. This study summarises the state of knowledge of seabed habitats within the Hauraki Gulf and the comparatively sparsely studied Waikato Coastal Marine Area west coast, to provide a single habitat and bathymetry resource for the entire Waikato coast (east and west). The bathymetric and substrate data have been used to identify what type of ecological communities are likely to be present, especially ecologically valuable areas.

The conference, which is being held 3-5 July at the Napier War Memorial Conference Centre, has as its theme ‘Weaving the Strands' - drawing together data, disciplines, and perspectives to tell the New Zealand marine story.

For more information, visit the conference website at www.nzmss2018.co.nz or contact us at enquires@metocean.co.nz

 

João Marcos Souza joins MetOcean Solutions

We are delighted to welcome Dr João Marcos Souza to MetOcean Solutions. João is a physical oceanographer with vast experience in hydrodynamic ocean modelling, and will be leading the ocean modelling component of the Moana Project, based in our Raglan Office.

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“João is a recognised expert in data assimilation modelling, and has strong international connections in the ocean modelling and observing community, an important link for Moana Project,” says Prof Moninya Roughan, MetOcean Solutions' Chief Scientist and Moana Project Director. “He brings a unique capability in ROMS Data Assimilation, and we look forward to advancing New Zealand’s contribution to international efforts in ocean data assimilation.”

With more than 15 years of experience, his expertise is in interdisciplinary ocean processes and data assimilative hydrodynamic simulations. In his most recent research position, João was the principal investigator on several projects, including the development of an ocean reanalysis using the ROMS model with 4-dimensional variational data assimilation to investigate predictability of ocean forecast systems, analysis of deep circulation in the Gulf of Mexico using a combination of observations and model results, and range of nearshore circulation studies coupling hydrodynamic and wave models.

Following his PhD in Ocean Engineering at Rio de Janeiro Federal University, Brazil, in 2008, João completed postdoctoral internships at the French Research Institute for the Exploitation of the Sea - IFREMER in 2011 and the University of Hawaii in 2014. Complementing his science role, he has mentored undergraduate and graduate students and postdoctoral researchers in physical oceanography. His most recent projects include the use of lagrangian analysis methods with biogeochemical and ocean circulation modelling.

“I am very excited to join the team and hope to add value to the fantastic work being done at Metocean Solutions,” says João. “It is clear to me that great science can only be achieved through strong collaboration which is valued so highly by the MetOcean team.”

Senegal-Mauritania wave and hydrodynamic hindcast models now available

MetOcean Solutions recently completed the development of high-resolution wave and hydrodynamic hindcast models offshore Senegal and Mauritania, West Africa.

“Senegal and Mauritania coastal areas are influenced by oceanographic processes, including tides, coastal upwelling/downwelling, eddies, internal waves, and highly-energetic wave conditions,” says Senior Oceanographer Dr Séverin Thiébaut. “Our challenge was to ensure the models would adequately replicate those multi-scale processes and both ambient and extreme metocean conditions.”

The Simulating WAves Nearshore (SWAN) model was used to resolve the wave climate and the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) was applied to simulate the hydrodynamic circulation. The technique implemented is known as ‘dynamical downscaling’, using information from large scale global models to drive regional/nearshore models at much higher resolution. All models were carefully calibrated with measured data from several current meters and wave buoys that were made available.

The SWAN model simulates the growth, refraction and decay of each frequency-direction component of the complete sea state, providing a realistic description of the wave field as it changes in time and space.

“In order to reliably replicate the regional and nearshore wave climate, the SWAN nests were defined with increasing resolutions of 5 km, 1 km and 100 m,” explains Séverin. “This approach allows the model to resolve fine-scale features near the coast while still accounting for remote influences to the area from far-field generated swell.”

Full spectral boundaries were prescribe from the MetOcean Solutions’ global wave model to the 5-km SWAN domain. The latter was used to force the boundaries of the 1-km SWAN domain, which in turn was applied to the boundaries of the high-resolution 100-m SWAN domain (Figure 1). All model nests were simulated in series over 39 years (1979 to 2017).

 Figure 1: Snapshot of modelled significant wave height from the 5-km resolution SWAN parent nest off the Senegal/Mauritania coasts, delimited by the outer rectangle on (a). Extents of the 1-km resolution child nest are represented by the outer and inner rectangles on (a) and (b), respectively. Extents of the 100-m resolution child nest are represented by the inner rectangle on (b).

Figure 1: Snapshot of modelled significant wave height from the 5-km resolution SWAN parent nest off the Senegal/Mauritania coasts, delimited by the outer rectangle on (a). Extents of the 1-km resolution child nest are represented by the outer and inner rectangles on (a) and (b), respectively. Extents of the 100-m resolution child nest are represented by the inner rectangle on (b).

This ROMS model is an open source state of the art ocean model which has been used widely in the scientific community and industry for a range of ocean basin, regional and coastal scales. ROMS has a curvilinear horizontal coordinate system and solves the hydrostatic, primitive equations subject to a free-surface condition. Its terrain-following vertical coordinate system results in accurate modelling of areas of variable bathymetry, allowing the vertical resolution to be inversely proportional to the local depth. Two ROMS nests were defined with horizontal resolutions of approximately 6 km and 2 km for the regional and local model grid domains, respectively, as shown in Figure 2.

 Figure 2: ROMS (a) regional (6 km) and (b) local (2km) computational model grids. The red lines illustrate the transect corresponding to the vertical sigma grid structures provided in the following figure. Note the bathymetry is represented with distinct colorbars in (a) and (b).

Figure 2: ROMS (a) regional (6 km) and (b) local (2km) computational model grids. The red lines illustrate the transect corresponding to the vertical sigma grid structures provided in the following figure. Note the bathymetry is represented with distinct colorbars in (a) and (b).

The terrain-following grid configuration consisted of 30 and 23 vertical levels with increased resolution at surface and near-bottom to better represent the boundary layers (Figure 3). The model was produced over 25 years (1993 to 2017), delivering 3-dimensional current, water temperature and salinity and sea surface elevation data.

 Figure 3: Representation of the 30 vertical sigma levels of the regional grid domain over a cross-shelf transect along the latitude of 16.064०N.

Figure 3: Representation of the 30 vertical sigma levels of the regional grid domain over a cross-shelf transect along the latitude of 16.064०N.

Hindcast datasets offer key baseline information for project scoping, offshore and coastal design, project planning and environmental impact assessments.

For further information about MetOcean Solutions hindcast datasets, please contact hindcast@metocean.co.nz.

A record wave height measured in the Southern Ocean

Last night, the MetOcean Solutions wave buoy moored in the Southern Ocean recorded a massive 23.8 m wave.

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“This is a very exciting event and to our knowledge it is largest wave ever recorded in the Southern Hemisphere,” says Senior Oceanographer Dr Tom Durrant. “Our own previous record was one year ago when we measured a 19.4 m wave, and before that in 2012  an Australian buoy recorded a maximum individual wave (Hmax) of 22.03 m. So, this is a very important storm to capture, and it will add greatly to our understanding of the wave physics under extreme conditions in the Southern Ocean.”

“However, it is likely that the peak heights during this storm were actually much higher, with individual waves greater than 25 m being possible as the wave forecast for the storm show larger wave conditions just north of the buoy location. Also, to conserve battery during the one year deployment, the solar-powered buoy samples the waves for just 20 minutes every 3 hours then sends the data via a satellite link. During that 20 minute recording period, the height, period and direction of every wave is measured and statistics are calculated. It's very probable that larger waves occurred while the buoy was not recording.  

“The Southern Ocean is a unique ocean basin and is the least studied despite occupying 22% of the global ocean area. The persistent and energetic wind conditions here create enormous fetch for wave growth, making the Southern Ocean the engine room for generating swell waves that then propagate throughout the planet - indeed surfers in California can expect energy from this storm to arrive at their shores in about a weeks time! Yesterdays storm is the perfect example of waves generated by the easterly passage of a deep low pressure system with associated wind speeds exceeding 65 knots. Such storms are frequent and can occur at any time of the year, which differs from the high latitude northern hemisphere storms that only occur in winter. What is interesting about yesterday's event is the storm speed appears to match the wave speed, allowing wave heights to grow dramatically as the system tracks eastward.”

 Simulation of the storm: wind and mean sea level pressure (left) and significant wave height (right) passing over south New Zealand.

Simulation of the storm: wind and mean sea level pressure (left) and significant wave height (right) passing over south New Zealand.

“This is exactly the sort of data we were hoping to capture at the outset of the program,” says MetOcean Solutions General Manager Dr Peter McComb, who led the deployment of the buoy in March onboard the HMNZS WELLINGTON. “ We know that the speed of these storms plays an important role in the resultant wave climate and that has great relevance under both the existing and climate change scenarios.”

The ‘significant wave height’ is the WMO standard value to characterise a sea state - approximately the average of the highest third of the measured waves. During this storm, the significant wave height reached 14.9 m. This is also a record for the Southern Ocean, but falls short of the 19 m world record buoy measurement that was recorded in the North Atlantic during 2013.

The Campbell Island Wave Rider Buoy was moored on 2 March 2018 at Campbell Island, New Zealand’s southernmost estate and an ideal spot to sample the complex directional wave spectra from the Southern Ocean.

The Southern Ocean wave studies are a collaborative project with New Zealand Defence Force, Defence Technology Agency and  Spoondrift. As part of that program, MetOcean Solutions has deployed seven instruments to collect wave data, using one moored and six drifting buoys. All data are freely available to the scientific community and can be viewed in real time. For further information and data access see www.metocean.co.nz/southern-ocean/ or contact us at enquiries@metocean.co.nz.

MetOcean Solutions is a wholly owned subsidiary of state-owned enterprise, Meteorological Service of New Zealand (MetService). MetService is New Zealand’s national weather authority, providing comprehensive weather information services, to help protect the safety and well-being of New Zealanders and the economy.

Meet us at PIANC World Congress 2018 in Panama

MetOcean Solutions will be at the 34th PIANC World Congress 2018 in Panama next week.

Sébastien Boulay, MetOcean Solutions’ Business Development Scientist will present "A simplified approach to operationalise under-keel clearance (UKC) calculations" together with Brendan Curtis from OMC International.

“With freely available web-deployed UKC calculators and subscription services offering high resolution environmental forecasts for ports around the world, port users can now make much better-informed operational decisions,” says Sébastien. “We are delighted to be at PIANC 2018 presenting our solutions designed to increase safety and efficiency of marine operations.”

The conference, which is held 7-11 May, is hosted by the World Association for Waterborne Transport and Infrastructure and The Panama Canal Authority to discuss latest trends and best practices in the waterborne, transport and infrastructure sector.

For more information, visit the conference website: www.pianc2018.com

New open-source library for processing ocean wave spectra

MetOcean Solutions is pleased to make an open-source release of a new python library for processing ocean wave spectra.

 Example of wave spectra. Time series of significant wave height (top). Directional wave spectrum during peak storm, red circle in the top panel (bottom).

Example of wave spectra. Time series of significant wave height (top). Directional wave spectrum during peak storm, red circle in the top panel (bottom).

“We are very enthusiastic about releasing our Wavespectra source code for processing wave data,” says Physical Oceanographer Dr Rafael Guedes. “The library is the result of a collaborative effort from our science team for dealing with ocean wave spectral data, and it has been extensively used and tested. By making it freely available, we hope to contribute to the scientific community, while at the same time encouraging researchers to become involved and further develop and improve the code.”

“Wavespectra is a powerful collection of tools to ingest, process and write spectra in common formats. It allows robust calculation of common integrated spectral wave parameters such as wave height, period and direction, as well as partitioning the wave spectra using different methods to separate wind sea from swells.”

“The code is focussed on speed and efficiency for large spectral datasets. It leverages existing libraries such as xarray which provides efficient and convenient methods for dealing with multidimensional datasets.  Wavespectra can be used to handle spectral output from wave models such as WAVEWATCH III and SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) and also standard measured spectra files. It will be of use to scientists, students and consultants.”

 The Wavespectra library documentation is available at wavespectra.readthedocs.io/en/docs/ and the GitHub repository at github.com/metocean/wavespectra.

 For further information about Wavespectra library or any contribution, please contact us at enquiries@metocean.co.nz.

Henrique Rapizo joins MetOcean Solutions

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We are delighted to welcome Dr Henrique Rapizo to MetOcean Solutions. Henrique is a physical oceanographer and will be working in our science team in Raglan. As a wave modelling expert, he will be providing support to operational and consultancy projects at MetOcean Solutions.

Following an MSc in Ocean and Coastal Engineering at Rio de Janeiro Federal University, Brazil, Henrique has completed last year his PhD in Maritime Engineering and Physical Oceanography at Swinburne University of Technology,  Australia. His research was focused on interactions between wind-generated ocean waves with currents, including theoretical, observational and numerical approaches.

With a specialisation on wave-current interactions, Henrique`s research interests are also on coastal processes and dynamics, air-sea interactions,  wave-ocean numerical coupling and data analysis.

“MetOcean Solutions is one of the few companies in the world that unifies the fast pace and technical approach of operational procedures with very high scientific level,” says Henrique. “I am really excited to be part of such a qualified team and contribute to the development of the wave-ocean modelling products.”

High resolution tides to support Volvo Ocean Race team

 Visit to Auckland`s Volvo Ocean Race Village. Miles Seddon (MAPFRE`s onshore navigator), Sally Garrett (Defence Technology Agency), David Johnson (MetOcean Solutions), and Sam Vernon (Crown Infrastructure).

Visit to Auckland`s Volvo Ocean Race Village. Miles Seddon (MAPFRE`s onshore navigator), Sally Garrett (Defence Technology Agency), David Johnson (MetOcean Solutions), and Sam Vernon (Crown Infrastructure).

In association with Defence Technology Agency, MetOcean Solutions provided high resolution tidal forecasts in the Hauraki Gulf to MAPFRE during the Auckland Stopover of the 2017-18 Volvo Ocean Race.

“We are delighted that our local knowledge and models could assist the Spanish Volvo boat MAPFRE,” says Dr David Johnson, MetOcean Solutions’ Technical Manager. “Our very high resolution models of coastal currents and waves are perfect for this kind of application. In a highly competitive fleet as in the VOR, every bit of information is important for optimising routing decisions.”

MAPFRE ingested output from the MetOcean Solutions tidal model into their navigation systems providing accurate current predictions for the Hauraki Gulf. MAPFRE made the best start to lead the fleet around a loop of the Waitematā Harbour and out into the Hauraki Gulf (Volvo Ocean Race news). They are heading to Itajai, Brazil at a leading score position with 39 points, followed by Dongfeng Race Team. Follow Volvo Ocean Race live at www.volvooceanrace.com/en/tracker.html

In addition to a tidal prediction model, MetOcean Solutions has also developed a 26-year current hindcast of the Hauraki Gulf, using a 2-dimensional Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) model run at 250m resolution that accurately resolve the tides and water levels inside the Gulf (click here for more information).

For further information about the Hauraki Gulf hindcasts and tidal models, please contact enquiries@metocean.co.nz.

Southern Ocean Wave Buoy – Update

In 2017, MetOcean Solutions partnered with New Zealand Defence Force and Defence Technology Agency to deploy a scientific wave buoy in the Southern Ocean. Moored 11 km south of the remote Campbell Island, the buoy collected 170 days of great data - including the May 2017 storm with a whopping 19.4 m wave! By July however, the perpetually rough seas caused fatigue in the mooring line and the buoy started on a new and rather intrepid journey toward Chile.

 The buoy was launched on 2 March 2018.

The buoy was launched on 2 March 2018.

“It is still sending us valuable data while drifting,” says oceanographer Dr Tom Durrant. “We are now seeing high quality wave measurements coming in from some of the remotest locations on Earth; it is extremely valuable data for our research.”

Meanwhile, the mission to collect wave data for NZ Navy’s SubAntarctic applications continues, and this year’s initiative has seen another wave buoy positioned at Campbell Island. This is New Zealand’s southernmost estate and an ideal spot to sample the complex directional wave spectra from the Southern Ocean. On 2 March 2018, MetOcean Solutions manager and senior oceanographer Dr Peter McComb led the buoy deployment from the Offshore Patrol Vessel HMNZS WELLINGTON, with support from Sally Garrett and William Coldicutt from the Defence Technology Agency.

 Offshore Patrol Vessel HMNZS WELLINGTON.

Offshore Patrol Vessel HMNZS WELLINGTON.

“The crew of HMNZS WELLINGTON undertook the task with utmost professionalism and detailed planning to ensure a safe and successful execution,” says Peter. “In 2.5 m seas and light winds, the new wave buoy and its mooring were carefully placed at the same site as last year.”

This year however, the mooring design has been modified to better suit the harsh conditions and reduce the risk of mooring failure before the servicing mission next summer.

“We have to find the right balance for robustness in the mooring system while maintaining scientific integrity of the data. It is certainly a challenge working in these southern latitudes,” admits Peter. “But every month of data adds significantly to our knowledge of this ocean basin, so it’s a very worthy challenge”.

All data from the wave buoy programme is openly available for research, and interested members of the public can check the Southern Ocean wave conditions in real-time at http://www.metocean.co.nz/southern-ocean.

Forecasting Gita - extreme storm surge and wave heights

When tropical storm Gita passed over New Zealand on 20-21 February this year, high winds and low pressures combined with energetic ocean swells caused significant storm surges along the New Zealand West Coast.  

Storm surge is the abnormal rise of water generated by a storm, over and above the predicted astronomical tides. When accompanied by high waves, this surge can cause significant damage to coastal areas, including flooding and accelerated erosion.

“The storm offered an opportunity to validate our inhouse wave and surge models,” explains Dr Séverin Thiébaut, senior oceanographer at MetOcean Solutions. “Validation is when we compare the model results directly with in situ measurements, and provides us with a clear indication of how good our models are at predicting the timing and the magnitude of extreme storms. For Gita, we used data from a tide gauge at Charleston on the West Coast and a wave buoy in offshore south Taranaki.”

The forecast model predictions of storm surge and wave height during the storm are shown in Figures 1 and 2, respectively. Modelled wind and rainfall are also presented in these figures. These operational models are produced by MetOcean Solutions for a range of applications in NZ waters. The models are tuned to replicate the typical conditions, so verifying the predictions under an extreme storm is a powerful test.

 
 Figure 1: Predicted storm surge progress: wind and rain (left) and storm surge (right) coincide as tropical storm Gita passes over New Zealand.

Figure 1: Predicted storm surge progress: wind and rain (left) and storm surge (right) coincide as tropical storm Gita passes over New Zealand.

 
 
 Figure 2: Predicted wave progress: wind and rain (left) and wave height (right) forecast as tropical storm Gita passes over New Zealand.

Figure 2: Predicted wave progress: wind and rain (left) and wave height (right) forecast as tropical storm Gita passes over New Zealand.

 

In Figures 3 and 4 we present the time series comparison of measured and forecast storm surge and wave heights.

“The test shows our model slightly underestimated the storm surge as measured by the nearshore tide gauge,” continues Séverin. “This is likely due to the geometry of the small bay where the tide gauge is located plus the effects of wave setup on the measured water levels. Near the shore, waves will produce a localised increase in water level, which magnifies the observed storm surge. However, we are delighted the timing of the predictions was good and the magnitude acceptable for an open-coast extreme.”

“The Charleston tide gauge was located on the margin of the main storm surge effect; the model predicted coastal water level elevations up to 0.50 m in the northern parts of the South Island but unfortunately no open coast tide gauges are located in that area.”

 Figure 3: Time series of the storm surge as measured by the Charleston tide gauge data (Source:  LINZ ) and the MetOcean Solutions forecast values. The tide gauge reads higher values due to wave setup and the close proximity to shore.

Figure 3: Time series of the storm surge as measured by the Charleston tide gauge data (Source: LINZ) and the MetOcean Solutions forecast values. The tide gauge reads higher values due to wave setup and the close proximity to shore.

“The comparison for offshore wave height was excellent for a such rapidly moving system. At the offshore wave buoy, the forecast timing and height of the waves were very well correlated with the measured storm values. The highest measured significant wave height was 8.8 m, while the forecast value was 8.4 m. “It is very encouraging to see the models perform with such confidence under these extreme storm conditions,” notes Séverin. “For context, the largest significant wave height ever recorded on the West Coast of NZ was 10.4 m, measured in May 1977 near the Maui A platform.”

 Figure 4: Time series of the measured and modelled significant wave height at the offshore wave buoy (Source:  OMV ).

Figure 4: Time series of the measured and modelled significant wave height at the offshore wave buoy (Source: OMV).

Through our web portal MetOceanView, MetOcean Solutions provide automated storm watch services for coastal and offshore operators. These are automatically generated when preset conditions are identified within the forecast horizon. During the lead up to Gita’s landfall, significant wave heights of 8-9 m were predicted more than 3 days ahead (Figure 5). Warnings are sent via email alerts for operational decision-making - increasing safety and efficiency for people working at sea. These warnings are based on an ‘ensemble’ of  forecasts of the winds and waves, which captures the inherent uncertainty over a 7-day forecast horizon and the chaotic nature of a revolving tropical storm. Probabilistic guidance allows effective management decisions to be made within a robust, quantitative framework.

 
 Figure 5: Gita was forecast to be wild! Example of the ensemble forecast warning system that provided guidance on the range of possible outcomes for wind speed (top), significant wave height (middle) and wave direction (bottom) in the offshore Taranaki area.

Figure 5: Gita was forecast to be wild! Example of the ensemble forecast warning system that provided guidance on the range of possible outcomes for wind speed (top), significant wave height (middle) and wave direction (bottom) in the offshore Taranaki area.

 

MetOcean Solutions is a wholly owned subsidiary of state-owned enterprise, Meteorological Service of New Zealand (MetService). MetService is New Zealand’s national weather authority, providing comprehensive weather information services, to help protect the safety and well-being of New Zealanders and the economy.

For more information on our forecast models, contact us at enquiries@metocean.co.nz.

UK Ministry of Defence adopts SurfZoneView

The UK Ministry of Defence recently purchased an operational license for SurfZoneView, the New Zealand Navy software tool to support amphibious operations and beach landings.

 New Zealand Defence Force amphibious operation (Image: Defence Technology Agency)

New Zealand Defence Force amphibious operation (Image: Defence Technology Agency)

“Waves and currents make the surf zone a very dangerous environment,” explains Dr Rafael Guedes, senior oceanographer at MetOcean Solutions. “SurfZoneView provides high-resolution maps of the sea conditions in the surfzone, which helps determine the safest times and locations to offload equipment and personnel. This is crucial to the management of amphibious operations.”

Designed by MetOcean Solutions in partnership with the New Zealand Defence Force, SurfZoneView is based on the state-of-the-art XBeach numerical model. By resolving the main processes in this complex environment, the software clearly maps out the nearshore conditions and includes risk management tools to assist operational decision making.

“We are very pleased to supply our tool to one of the world’s largest defence forces,” says oceanographer Andre Lobato who manages the software updates. “It's great that the license also allows the tool to be used by the UK MetOffice for civilian purposes, such as search and rescue and beach safety analysis.”

The UK purchase coincides with the release of a new version of SurfZoneView.

“We had important feedback from amphibious units in Italy, UK, Australia and New Zealand. The new release incorporates a range of features requested by users after real training exercises,” continues Andre.

The tool clearly shows safe and unsafe zones for beach landings, and users can compare the relative safety of landing at different areas along a stretch of coastline, or at different times within a seven day forecast. Safety profiles allow users to test settings and examine how safety tolerances and vessel draughts alter the predictions.

 
 

In 2016, MetOcean Solutions won the Minister of Defence Industry Awards of Excellence for the SurfZoneView software. The uptake of the software by UK is further recognition of the value that accurate modelling, presented in a user-friendly format, can offer naval personnel operating in nearshore areas.

For more information on SurfZoneView, click here, or view the video for the 2016 award here.

Contact us on enquiries@metocean.co.nz for a trial version or demonstration of SurfZoneView.

Aitana Forcén-Vázquez heading to Antarctica

 Aitana with the wave drifter buoys on board Tangaroa.

Aitana with the wave drifter buoys on board Tangaroa.

On February 9, Dr Aitana Forcén-Vázquez headed to Antarctica aboard the research vessel Tangaroa on a six week science voyage with colleagues from NIWA and the University of Auckland.

Aitana’s role as Principal Investigator for Physical Oceanography is to support instrument deployment and data collection, including the deployment of 9 drifting wave buoys for MetOcean Solutions and the New Zealand Defence Technology Agency.

“I am delighted to be part of this important voyage,” says Aitana. “I have been to Antarctic waters once  before, but this time we are going much closer to the continent, which will make for a very interesting trip.”

 Tangaroa leaving Wellington on 9 February 2018.

Tangaroa leaving Wellington on 9 February 2018.

The research project, entitled ‘Taking the pulse of the Ross Sea outflow’ focuses on collecting data to further the understanding of water movement between the shallow shelf and the deeper ocean. How the Ross Sea outflow changes over time is important for our understanding of future Southern Ocean and South Pacific climate.

During the voyage, Aitana will contribute to the mission blog, which can be found at www.oceanphysicsauckland.co.nz

Perfect storm caused Nelson flooding

On February 1, Fehi caused storm surges along New Zealand’s west coast, impacting coastal communities in many locations around the country. In Nelson whole streets were flooded in low-lying areas, causing emergency services to evacuate residents. Coastal residents were also evacuated in other areas including Taranaki and West Coast.

“The flooding was caused by an unlucky combination of factors,” explains oceanographer Dr Rafael Soutelino. “A very low pressure system coincided with king high tides, large waves and strong winds, resulting in very high coastal water levels in several areas around the country’s west coast.

“Storm surges occur when the sea rises as a result of wind and atmospheric pressure changes associated with a storm. The surges build up over time and will worsen when a low pressure system lingers.

“On this occasion, our models predicted a storm surge of up to 50 cm in Hokitika, and just over 35 cm in the Nelson region. This may not sound like much but when added to a king tide the impact can be devastating. The wind direction is important too. In this event, the trajectory of the tropical storm caused north-northeasterly winds which acted to push water towards the shore, further raising coastal sea levels.  

 Storm surges of up to 35 cm above astronomical tide coincided with high winds in Nelson on 1 February 2018.

Storm surges of up to 35 cm above astronomical tide coincided with high winds in Nelson on 1 February 2018.

“Strong winds are common along the west coast of the South Island, but systems like Fehi that have tropical origin cause a much bigger pressure drop than normal winter storms. Such pressure drops cause sea level to rise, a phenomenon known as the inverse barometer effect.

“Storm surges of up to 50 cm are not unusual in New Zealand, and thankfully they most often do not coincide with king tides. However, occasionally the worst possible combination of events will occur, and at such time good forecasting become very important.”

Storm surge forecasts can predict dangerously high water levels up to seven days in advance, providing valuable alerts for for low-lying coastal locations. MetOcean Solutions frequently collaborates with emergency services and local authorities to provide forewarning when large storm surges are predicted.  

“Storm surges can be reliably predicted,” continues Rafael. “MetOcean Solutions forecasts storm surges nationwide using a complex high definition 3D hydrodynamical model with 5 km resolution.The model computes the atmospheric effects on coastal water levels. It combines this with baseline water levels generated by open ocean eddies and water column expansions and contractions caused by the spatially variable vertical density distribution.

“Waves also significantly modify water levels and consequent impacts of storm surges. We are currently working on improving our models to include waves in storm surge predictions for vulnerable locations around New Zealand. Hopefully such models will contribute towards keeping coastal communities safe when the next perfect storm hits.”

 The 35 cm storm surge coincided with king tides and winds pushing water ashore, resulting in widespread flooding in Nelson.

The 35 cm storm surge coincided with king tides and winds pushing water ashore, resulting in widespread flooding in Nelson.

Research partnership helps ocean industries

MetOcean Solutions and the Coastal and Regional Oceanography Group in the School of Mathematics and Statistics at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) are partnering to ensure that marine industries will benefit from the latest ocean research along the southeast coast of Australia.

“The science team at UNSW produces world-class research. By combining their ocean data and models with MetOcean Solutions’ operational experience we will provide an even better service for clients along the New South Wales coast,” says Prof Moninya Roughan, MetOcean Solutions' Chief Scientist and UNSW`s Coastal Oceanography Group Leader. “This collaboration helps make oceanographic research useable, making valuable knowledge easily accessible to marine industries and the public, and improving safety and efficiency at sea.”

The UNSW team developed a 23-year (1994-2016) hydrodynamic hindcast model using the 3D Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). The model simulates ocean circulation at sufficient resolution (2.5-6 km) to characterise the hydrodynamics in the region. Results have been validated with quality, long-term oceanographic data, and were distributed through the Australian Integrated Marine Observing Program (NSW-IMOS).

The MetOcean Solutions team use model output to generate statistics needed by clients for design purposes. In addition they have characterised the coastal marine environment at a number of locations along the coast of SE Australia, and are conducting research that will improve understanding of dynamical drivers of the coastal circulation. The data has also been used to provide boundary conditions to clients for further downscaling studies.

 Model domain and bathymetry showing the East Australian Current and the Tasman Front (Image by  Kerry et al, 2016 )

Model domain and bathymetry showing the East Australian Current and the Tasman Front (Image by Kerry et al, 2016)

“Using the UNSW regional model ensures we are providing the highest quality information for our clients,” says MetOcean Solutions Forecast Operations Manager Dr Rafael Soutelino. “We are very enthusiastic about working with UNSW, and all the improvements we can achieve for industries and governments operating at sea in the region.”

UNSW`s oceanography group has been studying the East Australian Current (EAC) for decades, collecting valuable in-situ data and developing a suite of high-resolution numerical ocean models for the region. The EAC is the Western Boundary Current of the South Pacific subtropical gyre that flows south along the east coast of Australia, dominating the coastal circulation from Brisbane to Tasmania.

“The EAC is characterised by high eddy variability and the correct representation of these eddies into nearshore hydrodynamic models is critical,” says Dr. Colette Kerry, Postdoctoral Research Associate in the School of Mathematics and Statistics at UNSW. “Advancing our understanding of the dynamics of the EAC will help improve model predictions.”

For further information about Australian oceanographic research and consultancy services, please contact Alexis Berthot in Sydney at a.berthot@metocean.co.nz.

Wind pattern affects the sea surface temperature around the New Zealand coast

“Persistent northeast sector winds are forecast to change the sea surface temperatures around New Zealand this coming week,” says MetOcean Solutions senior oceanographer, Dr Rafael Soutelino.

“Gisborne, Coromandel, and parts of Northland will have the surface water transported offshore, and replaced by cooler waters from depths,” explains Rafael. “Indeed a 3 degree drop to a chilly 16°C is expected in Gisborne by 19 January. Meanwhile, on the West Coast we will see the opposite effect, with further warming of the water near the shore. Raglan may see temperatures rising again to as high as 23°C in the next week. That’s 3 degrees above the average for January.”

“Other places like Bay of Plenty will have slight onshore flows, which will maintain the warm coastal waters,” he adds.

 The predicted winds and sea surface temperatures (left), and forecast graph (right) show the predicted sea surface temperatures at some coastal locations around New Zealand.

The predicted winds and sea surface temperatures (left), and forecast graph (right) show the predicted sea surface temperatures at some coastal locations around New Zealand.

The sea surface temperature forecasts are produced by the MetOcean Solutions Regional Ocean Modelling System (ROMS). For more information, contact us at enquiries@metocean.co.nz.

An Open Data Discussion

By Peter McComb and Malene Felsing

What are open data?

The New Zealand government defines open data as data that anyone can use and share - data which have open licences, are openly accessible and are both human- and machine-readable1.

Following the example of numerous countries, in August 2017 the New Zealand government adopted the International Open Data Charter, a non-binding agreement mandating that government data are open and accessible to all. The Open Data Charter builds on the New Zealand Declaration on Open and Transparent Government and the Data and Information Management Principles, through which the government has communicated an expectation that agencies proactively release high-value data, and work towards an ‘open by default’ approach2.

These policies were adopted based on evidence from overseas that open data enables the development of new knowledge, tools and services, which drive economic development.

Benefits of open data

Since the inception of the term ‘open data’ in 1996, and the concurrent explosion of the internet and the movement towards open source code, the benefits of open data have been assessed by many. The results of the research show that data create more value when they are widely utilised and well-governed.

The clear benefits of open data include:

  • Increased innovation as data become accessible to users from different disciplines.
  • Reduced barriers to entry into markets.
  • Creation of economic value through the development of new products, services or activities.
  • Efficiency gains in the public sector as agencies gain access to data that help streamline operations, and through non-duplication of data collection efforts.
  • Improvement in efficiency and productivity of private businesses using the data.
  • Flow-on effects as emerging second-order users add further economic and social benefits to the economy.
  • Increased government tax revenue through expanded economic activity, as well as higher revenue for individual agencies through the sale of high-value information to companies.
  • Public engagement as the wider population can access educational and cultural knowledge.
  • Improved social welfare as society benefits from transparent and accessible information, stimulating collaboration, participation and social innovation.
  • Greater transparency and accountability of public service providers.
  • Better policy-making based on better data.

There are numerous examples of international macroeconomic studies into the economic impact of open government data. A 2014 report3 assessing the value of open data for G20 economies predicted an AU$19 billion return on investment over five years from doubling the accessibility and use of Australian government and research data.

Who benefits the most?

Most analyses agree that open data benefits everyone - there are no real losers and widespread wins, because open data makes better use of existing resources. Consumers and the broader society stands to win the most, although there are some benefits to data providers. A European Union study4 concluded that releasing public sector information leads to modest direct revenues to governments. It estimated that most European nations would see a gain of 1% of agency budget, but that gains of up to 25% were possible. These estimates were based on the Netherlands and the UK, who both gather revenue from opening up government data. However, all studies agree that that open data creates new types of businesses, providing opportunities for small and medium enterprises and business models like advertiser-pays rather than end-user-pays5.

Open weather data

Of all the different types of public sector data, weather data have been identified as particularly important because everyone - including individuals, private companies, local and national government departments - can all benefit from it. Applications that make use of open weather data can therefore potentially have a huge impact.

Several studies have attempted to place a value on open weather data. Research from 20096 indicated that US adults used more than 300 billion forecasts per year at the time, which was valued (by the general public) at $286 per household per year, providing an aggregate annual valuation of weather forecasts of about US$31.5 billion. At the time, government and private sectors spent US$5.1 billion on meteorological operations, research and forecasting, which means that the value provided by weather forecasts was 6.2 times higher than the cost of producing them.

Open weather data in New Zealand?

This is a really good question for New Zealand to ponder during 2018. We have a small economy with a big ocean to manage and we tend to get a lot of weather! There are two state-funded organisations independently collecting data and independently producing high quality national weather forecasts, plus a range of international weather forecast providers with various types and qualities of data available. So, what is our current source of weather truth? Is there a better way for the needs of the New Zealand economy and general public to be served? To answer that question in a meaningful way, it’s helpful to consider where exactly data comes into the equation.

 The value ladder for society starts with data. We need open data so that all sectors of the economy can contribute to the generation of information and knowledge, so ultimately we can collectively and consistently make wise decisions.

The value ladder for society starts with data. We need open data so that all sectors of the economy can contribute to the generation of information and knowledge, so ultimately we can collectively and consistently make wise decisions.

This figure shows that data is the start of an entire value chain that takes society to a place where we can (hopefully) make wise decisions. In weather forecasting, data is both the observations and the model outputs. However, ‘data’ by itself is nearly useless to people, but when we turn it into ‘information’ such as a map or a graph, we create value because the data gains context. ‘Knowledge’ comes about when that information can be put to use, such as a warning of potentially hazardous conditions developing. It is situational awareness and requires prior experience or empirical findings. Finally, ‘wisdom’ is the place we want to get to in society, and modern-day tools like social media, smartphones and web sites allow us ready access to knowledge in its myriad of forms. The wise decisions we expect individuals to make are ones like:

               “I’m not going fishing today because the bar crossing might become dangerous.”
               “The conditions for climbing the peak are perfect tomorrow, so let's wait one more day.”
               “Better move the stock out of the river paddock because it's likely to flood tonight.”

Traditionally, the creation of weather knowledge has required human intervention, with trained forecasters interacting with data to produce guidance. As numerical weather models become better and more detailed weather measurements become available, the ability for models to accurately quantify and predict the weather will continue to improve. Weather on planet earth is still a chaotic process, however combining computer weather models with machine learning and other such techniques will allow us to become more quantitative when describing the present and future weather states.

And quantitative data is exactly what modern infrastructure demands. Think automated smart irrigation systems, traffic management algorithms and transport logistics networks to name just a few. All require weather data in the raw form to ingest and create information and knowledge specific to those applications. The global market for this is enormous, which is why private sector worldwide has invested so heavily in weather prediction and a whole new generation of sensing technologies. Within a few years the capability of private weather services will likely exceed that of most national weather agencies. Couple that with the disruption from constellations of small low cost weather satellites, and we have the imminent arrival of a new world order in weather forecasting.

What next?

So, back to data. New Zealand doesn’t have a great track record when it comes to making public funded environmental data openly available - but it's true we are making steady progress (see here). At the same time, the quantitative demands of the modern world are resulting in a flood of high quality private data becoming available and strong consumer options regarding alternative weather sources. In order to remain relevant, it might be timely for New Zealand to clearly define the national weather ‘sources of truth’, and perhaps actively push data into the economy to gain the universally benefit from the wealth multipliers that arise when enterprise creates knowledge from data.

Note - these are views of the authors, and do not represent MetOcean Solutions or MetService.

____________________

  1. https://www.data.govt.nz/toolkit/what-is-open-data/
  2. https://www.data.govt.nz/assets/Uploads/Adoption-of-the-International-Open-Data-Charter.pdf
  3. Omidyar Network (2014) Open for Business: How Open Data Can Help Achieve the G20 Growth Target https://www.omidyar.com/sites/default/files/file_archive/insights/ON%20Report_061114_FNL.pdf
  4. Vickery, G. (2011) Review of recent studies on PSI re-use and related market developments. European Commision. Available at: https://ec.europa.eu/digital-single-market/news/review-recent-studies-psi-reuse-and-related-market-developments
  5. Deloitte (2011) Pricing of Public Sector Information Study (POPSIS) - Models of supply and charging for public sector information (ABC) - final report. Available for download at: https://ec.europa.eu/digital-single-market/en/news/pricing-public-sector-information-study-popsis-models-supply-and-charging-public-sector
  6. Lazo, J.K., Morss, R.E., and J.L. Demuth (2009) 300 Billion Served: Sources, Perceptions, Uses, and Values of Weather Forecasts. Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. 90(6).

Support for the New Zealand Ocean Data Network

MetOcean Solutions is delighted to support the New Zealand Ocean Data Network (NZODN), a new initiative coordinated by the National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research (NIWA) to make New Zealand ocean data discoverable and freely available to all.

The NZODN is a national data platform that supports integrated access to marine and climate science data. NIWA has set up the NZODN as a node of the Australian Ocean Data Network (AODN) fully built on the services stack designed by the Australian Integrated Marine Observing System (IMOS).

The NZODN website has been launched as a public New Zealand resource, a ‘sister site’ to the AODN portal. This platform will greatly enhance data discovery and provide access to all available marine data collected in the New Zealand ocean domain.

 Find out more about the New Zealand Ocean Data Network at  https://nzodn.nz

Find out more about the New Zealand Ocean Data Network at https://nzodn.nz

MetOcean Solutions holds an extensive historical ocean database and is working towards quality control, formatting and documentation of these data so that they can be made publicly available through the NZODN infrastructure.

“We are very excited by the NZODN initiative. It is an important step for an integrated open data network that can be used by New Zealand's scientists and data-users,” says Prof Moninya Roughan, MetOcean Solutions' Chief Scientist. “It will greatly enhance the exchange of oceanographic knowledge and information, supporting ocean research and development of operational ocean services for NZ.”

IMOS Director Tim Moltmann says, “This is a major milestone for the collaboration between the two nations. The New Zealand Ocean Data Network Portal and our AODN portal complement each other, which allows for future strengthening of the collaboration in this region.”

Click here to access the datasets available at New Zealand Ocean Data Network or to find out more about how to contribute data.

Jorge Perez joins MetOcean Solutions

We are very pleased to welcome Dr Jorge Perez to MetOcean Solutions. Jorge is a physical oceanographer and will be working in our science team in Raglan. In his role, he will work on improving wave hindcasting and forecasting capabilities at Metocean Solutions.

 
Jorge Perez.jpg
 

Following an MSc in Coastal and Port Engineering, Jorge completed a PhD in Physical Oceanography at the University of Cantabria, Spain. His research has focused on wave climate, including a wide range of temporal and spatial scales.

With almost 10 years of experience in wave dynamics, Jorge has participated in a broad variety of projects, developing innovative solutions for statistical downscaling methods, wave tracking algorithms, and climate change projections. In his last research position he managed wave climate databases and generated wave historical data.

“Metocean Solutions makes top quality data easily accessible, removing the gap between advancements of research and final users,” says Jorge. “I am happy to join the team and participate in this exciting development”.